Triangle Away 3.25 Now Supports Android 4.4 on the Galaxy S 4 and Note 3

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for quite some time, you’re undoubtedly aware that many modern Samsung devices keep an internal flash counter that keeps track of how many times you flash custom firmware onto your device. Luckily, a fix for this has been available for quite some time thanks to Senior Recognized Developer Chainfire‘s fantasticTriangleAway app. But ever since its release, it’s beena bit of a cat and mouse game where a TriangleAway version would be released, followed by a new firmware update that blocks the app’s functionality.

Now, the next chapter in never-ending war between the community and the OEMs is here, as Chainfire has updated his TriangleAway app to version 3.25. The new version brings support for the Qualcomm-powered Galaxy Note 3 (must be running the now official Android 4.4.2 firmware), as well as for the leaked Android 4.4.2 firmware for the Qualcomm-powered Galaxy S 4.

It is important to keep in mind that TriangleAway’s purpose is only to reset the flash counter. It is not able to reset your KNOX Warranty void status at this time. Furthermore, the Galaxy Note 3 is only supported on Android 4.4. While the OTA has only occurred for certain unlocked variants of the device, it is highly likely that this will also work on carrier-branded versions once they receive their updates.

Make your way over to the TriangleAway thread to download the update, as well as Chainfire’s Google+ release notes to read up on this latest update.

TriangleAway 3.25 Now Supports Android 4.4 on the Galaxy S 4 and Note 3!

 

Beats Music Launches January 21, Partners With AT&T for $14.99 Per Month Family Plan

beats music android

Beats Music, the streaming music service created by the headphone giant of the same name, will launch January 21 in an exclusive partnership deal with AT&T. For $14.99, your entire family (up to 5 members and 10 devices) can be a part of Beats Music, and that’s after you try the service for free for 90 days. With access to over 20 million songs and “a unique curated experience,” AT&T is telling you to download at will as well. They claim to have made Beats Music available on an unlimited basis (both streaming an downloading for offline listening) for AT&T subscribers. We’re not sure if this is their firstsponsored data deal or something separate, but they are making this sound as if your tiered data plan is unaffected by the service.

If you are an individual, you can access Beats Music on up to 3 devices for $9.99 per month.

So what is Beats Music and why should you consider it? 

This is how CEO of Beats Music, Ian Rogers, explains it:

We wanted to build a music service that combined the freedom of an on-demand subscription service – unlimited, uninterrupted streaming and downloads of tens of millions of songs – but layer on top features that would give you that feeling only music that moves you can give. The right song at the right time will give you a chill. Make you pull someone close. Nod your head. Sing in the mirror. Roll down the car window and crank the volume to the right.

The Beats Music team put together curated playlists by industry big wigs, wants there to be music on-hand with the touch of a button for your mood or situation (open the app and hit “Play”), has lists of programmers’ picks, and yet still lets you create your own playlists or download music for offline listening. I’d say that’s pretty standard streaming music stuff, although, with the backing of major industry players and their “Highlights” section, which allows you to tell Beats Music to play something based on your mood or location, that it offers at least a couple of new wrinkles.

The music service will be available on Android, iPhone, and Windows Phone on January 21. Be sure to claim your usernameif you haven’t already.

 beats music

 

via source: droid life beats music spot of CEO

Moto G Kernel Source Updated for KitKat, Latest Droids Now Receiving Widespread 4.4 Rollout

Moto G Kernel Source Updated for KitKat, Latest Droids Now Receiving Widespread 4.4 Rollout     

Google-owned Motorola keeps courting us by making all of the right moves, as they have been updating all of their current devices to KitKat left and right. We first saw the update make its way to the Verizon Moto X, even before the Google Play edition devices received their updates. And then a little under one month ago, Android 4.4.2 started rolling out to the Moto G.

Now, Googoorola has released the GPL-mandated kernel source code files for the well liked Moto G running KitKat. Back in early December, wesaw the release of these same open source files for the device’s initial Jelly Bean firmware release. And now, they have been updated for Android 4.4, enabling your favorite aftermarket kernel devs to do what they do best. If you’re a kernel or ROM developer looking to get in on building a KitKat-capable kernel for the Moto G, make your way over to the SourceForge link below.

And in other Motorola news, the KitKat rollout that began on the Droid Maxx/Ultra/Mini as apreliminary soak test is now seeing a widespread rollout to the greater population of Verizon Droid users. This comes nearly one month after the initial soak test, and comes in at the same software version 19.5.3. Unfortunately, as we’ve seen from Verizon as of late, it also packs a little more bloatware. This comes in the form of a newly integrated NFL Mobile app, as well as the new “SSO client.”

Are you happy with Motorola’s efforts to appeal to the aftermarket development and enthusiast communities? Let us know in the comments below, and don’t forget to visit the Moto G and Droid Maxx/Ultra/Mini forums!

via source: xda’s forum. offiicial motorola blog,,[]

Add the Jelly Bean Easter Egg to Your Favorite Gingerbread or ICS ROM

The Android  team has a sense of humor, and has put several funny easter eggs into their code. Probably the best known easter egg is the “hidden” pseudo-game in the About Phone section. Tapping on the Android version several times launches a screen with Jelly Beans, KitKats, or other funny stuff. Now, you can port these little mini games to other Android versions.

 Recognized Contributor iamareebjamal wrote a guide for Gingerbread devices, and explained what needs to be done to swap the standard easter egg screen with the one from Jelly Bean. This can be done by using reverse engineering tools like APKTool and derivatives.

The process of adding in the easter egg is pretty straightforward. You need to add a few lines of Smali code to one of decompiled files, and then recompile the framework. The changed file can then be pushed back to your device, and you can enjoy Jelly Bean easter egg or use it to fool your friends. This mod should work on almost every device running Gingerbread or Ice Cream Sandwich.

More information about what needs to be done can be found in the original thread, so go there and give it a try. You can find tons of hilarious source code comments on Stack Overflow.

 

KitKat Now 1.4% of Android Users, Nearly 60% Running Jelly Bean, Gingerbread Down to 21%

A little over a month ago, Google released its Android Platform Distribution Statistics for the tail end of 2013. Now, we’ve entered a new year. And as expected, we also have a new batch of platform stats available on the Android Developer Dashboard.

In general, the new stats indicate a gradual move to newer Android OS builds. In the last month, KitKat rose from 1.1% to 1.4%. While this number may not sound like a lot, it’s still somewhat surprising given how few devices actually have official Android 4.4 updates. And if leaks are indicative of an impending release, we can expect this number to rise dramatically in the coming months. Similarly, Jelly Bean rose from 54.5% to 59.1%. This can be explained by all of the Android 4.3 updates we’ve seen popping up for various devices in the past few weeks.

As expected, older OSes generally saw a decline in usage. In the span of one month, Ice Cream Sandwich usage declined from 18.6% to 16.9%. Similarly, Gingerbread went from 24.1% to 21.2%. Froyo also took a bit of a dip from 1.6% to 1.3%. And that red-headed stepchild Honeycomb? Well, that’s the same at 0.1%.

Are you excited to see the slow but steady progress being made to bring newer versions of Android to more users, or are you disappointed that only 1.4% of users are running the latest major version of our favorite little green robot? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

 

HTC One X and One X+ Won’t Receive KitKat—Seriously!?

We’ve been talking about Android 4.4 updates, both official and unofficial, ever since KitKat was released alongside the Google Nexus 5 back in October of last year. And thankfully, the number of devices with official KitKat firmware releases is finally starting to gain some momentum. Despite this KitKat growth, many other devices have just recently received official Android 4.3 updates and/or leaks. While this isn’t ideal, at least some progress is being made towards relatively new firmwares.

However, there are some notable former flagships that are stuck in Android 4.2 land, and will never see any newer releases in official capacity. This unfortunately includes the HTC One X and One X+, the latter of which is one day shy of being just thirteen months old!

This sad news was first posted to HTC UK’s twitter account yesterday morning. And then in a statement issued to TheVerge, HTC expanded upon this by stating:

We can confirm that the HTC One X and One X+ will not receive further Android OS updates beyond Android 4.2.2 with Sense 5. We realize this news will be met with disappointment by some, but our customers should feel confident that we have designed both devices to be optimized with our amazing camera and audio experiences.

 

 

HTC, I can only imagine what your shareholders must be thinking right now. You are barely scraping by financially, only earning a marginal profit last quarter by ridding yourself of Beats. And now, you wish to further alienate your already unhappy customers by not even providing updates for a thirteen month old device? Moreover, Android 4.3 was released only 8 months after the One X+ debuted! And as we’ve seen in all of the various ports to devices with far less powerful hardware, KitKat would run beautifully on the One X and One X+. Words just cannot express… There is no reasonable logic to be found here.

Are you a disgruntled HTC One X and One X+ owner who feels abandoned by this formerly glorious OEM, or have you already said goodbye to the Sense world and moved on to aftermarket, AOSP-derived ROMs? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

via:HTC uk twitter , the verge from xda

Modified ViewPager Library Reduces the Size of Your Application

Modified ViewPager Library Reduces the Size of Your Application

The ViewPager class is commonly used in Android, starting from Honeycomb onwards. You can see it in action in the Google Play Store, where you can browse applications or games by category, by simply swiping left or right.

These applications are also often created to be compatible with older versions of Android such as Froyo. However, not many devices run Froyo anymore, as more than 75% of devices run Honeycomb or greater. Keeping compatibility with older versions forces the developer to make the APK bigger and possibly slower.

XDA Senior Member gade12 modified the Google Library to reduce its size by removing compatibility libs. Gade12 removed all unrelated code before API level 11. The ViewPager library after modification is much smaller, and it takes just over 120 KB. Using it in your application will reduce the amount of code, size and possibly improve the speed of the application. Of course, this breaks the compatibility with older Android devices, but you still have a choice between the original library from Google and the modified one by gade12.

If you are an app developer and want to try modified ViewPager library in one of your projects, make your way to the original thread and grab the compiled Java Archive. You can see ViewPager class in action in the following video: